“To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee

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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is separated into two parts: one centers around the Atticus’ children’s point of view and their childhood and the other centers around the case of Tom Robinson still in the eyes of the children. The novel examines racism in the 1930’s through the eyes of innocent children and raises several questions about the nature of prejudice and its effects on behavior such as “Are people naturally evil or are they products of societal norms?” and “is our current judicial system flawed so that justice is in the hands of mob rule?” To Kill a Mockingbird is a great read for anyone who likes literature about the 1930’s and the great depression. This may also interest readers who would like to understand the nature of prejudice, especially during the Jim Crow Era of American history.

Check this book out or put it on hold

-Tyler M.

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“Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins

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Following the events of the original hunger games, catching fire brings more action, story, and plot to the expanding universe of the hunger games franchise. Katniss, after surviving the 74th hunger games, enter into a special 75th game in which all of the previous winners participate. Catching fire again examines the class difference between the elites in the capital and the lower class’ that live in the 13 districts except this time the resistance within the districts are struggling to fight against the government. The themes in this novel consist of societal analysis on the social economic divide between these two types of people and the actions necessary to balance back the scales of justice. I would suggest this book to those who read the first book and enjoyed it. I would also suggest this book and the previous book in the series to those who are interested in dystopian societies.

Check this book out or put it on hold

-Tyler M.

“The Millionaire Next Door” by Thomas J. Stanley

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Although not your typical teen read The Millionaire Next Door is a classic and a must read for anyone who hopes to achieve financial security and independence. It was written by two business professors in the 1970’s who set out to catalogue the behavior and characteristics of millionaires.  Initially they sought these “millionaires” from residents of affluent neighborhoods who drove expensive cars and had all the external trappings of wealth only to discover that mats of these people had no actual financial assets. They then looked at people with large investment capital and found that they did not live the lifestyles one normally associates with the wealthy. These were people who made reasonable income but achieved their financial success by being frugal and responsible with their money.  I read this book because I am interested in finance and in learning how to manage money once I start making it.  I found the book extremely enlightening and full of practical advice that I can actually apply to my own life. I recommend it for all teens since we are not taught in high school or even college how to manage our money well and we live in a society where the motto seems to be spend now and worry later.

Check this book out or put it on hold

-Tyler M.