“The Millionaire Next Door” by Thomas J. Stanley

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Although not your typical teen read The Millionaire Next Door is a classic and a must read for anyone who hopes to achieve financial security and independence. It was written by two business professors in the 1970’s who set out to catalogue the behavior and characteristics of millionaires.  Initially they sought these “millionaires” from residents of affluent neighborhoods who drove expensive cars and had all the external trappings of wealth only to discover that mats of these people had no actual financial assets. They then looked at people with large investment capital and found that they did not live the lifestyles one normally associates with the wealthy. These were people who made reasonable income but achieved their financial success by being frugal and responsible with their money.  I read this book because I am interested in finance and in learning how to manage money once I start making it.  I found the book extremely enlightening and full of practical advice that I can actually apply to my own life. I recommend it for all teens since we are not taught in high school or even college how to manage our money well and we live in a society where the motto seems to be spend now and worry later.

Check this book out or put it on hold

-Tyler M.

“The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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The Great Gatsby, by Scott Fitzgerald, depicts the culture and atmosphere of the 1920s in the most accurate way, according to some historians. The classic tale of Nick Caraway, his neighbors Gatsby, Daisy, and Tom Buchanan encompasses the careless nature of the wealthy at that time, which led to the economic bubble of the Great Depression in the 1930s. The story’s centers around Nick Caraway and his point of view on the love between Gatsby and Daisy who both knew each other before World War 1. For five years after the war, Gatsby pursued the American dream, which included gaining wealth and maintaining his love for Daisy. Fast forward to the time when Nick moves to New York and he soon discovers that Gatsby is in love with his cousin, Daisy. Gatsby and Daisy eventually meet again and fall back in love although Daisy is married to Tom Buchanan, who is cheating on Daisy. The drama expressed in these characters makeup the style and prestige of the 1920’s. The themes of class status, the American Dream, and the carelessness of that era. I recommend The Great Gatsby for anyone who enjoys historical fiction and is curious about the culture of the 1920’s.

Check this book out or put it on hold

-Tyler M.